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Chinese

Section: File Formats (5)
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NAME

Chinese, chinese - Introduction to Chinese language support  

DESCRIPTION

There are two kinds of written Chinese characters, Traditional Chinese and Simplified Chinese. The former is widely used in Hong Kong (HK) and Taiwan, while the latter is more widely used in the People's Republic of China (PRC) and Singapore.
 

Codesets

There are several coded character sets (codesets) available to support each of the two written Chinese languages. For each Chinese language, the following list notes the supported codesets and the strings that represent those codesets in the names of locales, converters, and other kinds of system files: Codesets for Traditional Chinese: For more information, see dechanyu(5). For more information, see eucTW(5). For more information, see big5(5). For more information, see sbig5(5).

The Shift Big-5 codeset is supported for codeset conversion only; it is not used in locales or for both input and output operations. For more information, see telecode(5).
The Telecode codeset is supported for codeset conversion only; it is not used in locales or for both input and output operations. The cp950 encoding format is identical to big5. For more information, see code_page(5). For more information, see Unicode(5). Codesets for Simplified Chinese: For more information, see dechanzi(5). The cp936 encoding format is identical to dechanzi except that the code page supports additional characters. For more information, see code_page(5). For more information, see Unicode(5).
 

Locales

The following list groups supported locales according to language, country or territory, and codeset. Each locale supports one collation sequence, which is specified following the locale name. For Traditional Chinese, Taiwan: Collation using internal code order Collation by radical Collation by stroke Chuyin (phonetic) collation Collation using internal code order Collation by radical Collation by stroke Chuyin (phonetic) collation Collation using internal code order Collation by radical Collation by stroke Chuyin (phonetic) collation For Traditional Chinese, Hong Kong: Collation using internal code order Collation using internal code order Collation using internal code order For Simplified Chinese, Hong Kong: Collation using internal code order For Simplified Chinese, PRC: Collation using internal code order Collation by radical Collation by stroke Pinyin (Phonetic) collation

The asort(1) reference page contains more information on the collation sequences used for Asian languages.

You can use the locale command (see locale(1)) to display the names of locales installed on your system. See i18n_intro(5) for information on setting locale from the operating system command line.

For the Common Desktop environment (CDE), you also need to set your session language to an appropriate value by using the Language menu, which you access by clicking on the Options button of the Login window.
 

Keyboards, Input Servers, and Input Methods

The operating system supports the following Chinese keyboards: For Traditional Chinese:

LK201-D LK401-D For Simplified Chinese:
LK201-C LK401-C

See the keyboard(5) reference page for information about loading keyboard mapping tables (keymaps) for keyboards.

To support Chinese input in a Motif application environment such as CDE, the operating system provides the following input servers: For Traditional Chinese: See dxhanyuim(1X) for more information. For Simplified Chinese: See dxhanziim(1X) for more information.

The appropriate input server is started automatically for a CDE session based on the locale setting chosen through the login window. See the appropriate input server reference page for information about starting an input server from the command line.

The operating system supports the following Chinese input methods, listed by name under the written language with which the methods are used. Next to the name is the function key used to switch to that input method when the window for the input server is active. For Traditional Chinese:

(These input methods are enabled when the dxhanyuim server is running.)
Internal code, F8 Phonetic, F10 Phrase, F9 Quick Tsang-Chi, F7 Symbol Tsang-Chi, F6
Note that there are no locales to support the Shift Big-5 and Telecode character sets, so these characters cannot be input directly. For Simplified Chinese:
(These input methods are enabled when the dxhanziim server is running.)
5-stroke, F6 5-Shape, F10 Pin-Yin, or Phonetic, F8 Qu-Wei or Row-Column in GB2312-80, F7 Telex Code, F9 Phrase Input, F5

For the following terminals or keyboard settings, you can toggle between the English input mode and Chinese input mode by using a particular key or key sequence: For either Traditional Chinese on a VT382-D terminal keyboard or Simplified Chinese on a VT382-C terminal keyboard, press Compose. In CDE when LK201 is the keyboard setting, hold down the Compose key while pressing the Space bar (Compose+Space). In CDE when LK401 is the keyboard setting, use either Compose+Space or Shift+Space. In CDE for PC-style keyboard settings, use Shift+Space (for Hanzi) or Alt+Space (for Hanyu)

The preceding key sequences are defaults. You can override them by setting other keys to perform the same function.
 

Chinese Terminals

The operating system supports the VT382-D and the VT382-C terminals for Traditional Chinese and Simplified Chinese, respectively.
 

Running X and Motif Applications

X or Motif applications require non-ASCII fonts to display Chinese characters. Therefore, the font path must be set appropriately before starting an application that displays Chinese characters. An application can find Chinese fonts in either of the following directories: /usr/i18n/lib/X11/fonts/decwin/75dpi, for low resolution display /usr/i18n/lib/X11/fonts/decwin/100dpi, for high resolution display

For applications running under CDE, you should not need to enter manual commands to ensure that the appropriate fonts are found as long as those fonts are installed on the system or available through a font server. For other applications, you can use the following command to check the font path: % xset q

If one of the directories in the preceding list is not in the font path, the following example shows how to add the directory. You can substitute 100dp for 75dpi if you want high resolution display. % xset +fp /usr/i18n/lib/X11/decwin/75dpi/ % xset fp rehash


 

Printers

The operating system supports the following Chinese printers, grouped by language. The associated print filter is noted in parentheses following the printer name. For Traditional Chinese: The CP382-D is a Chinese dot matrix printer. The DEClaser 1152 is a PostScript printer that uses the font-faulting technique to download fonts. The DEClaser 5100 is a PostScript printer that uses a built-in font disk. The operating system also supports text printers that have built-in Traditional Chinese fonts and text printers to which Traditional Chinese fonts can be downloaded. For Simplified Chinese: The LA88-C is a Chinese dot matrix printer. The LA380-CB is a Chinese graphic line printer. The DEClaser 1152 is a PostScript printer that uses the font-faulting technique to download fonts. The DEClaser 5100 is a PostScript printer that uses a built-in font disk.

In addition, the pcfof and wwpsof generic print filters are available for use with many other printers to support Chinese printing. For more information on setting up and configuring printers, refer to i18n_printing(5) and lprsetup(8).
 

SEE ALSO

Commands: asort(1), locale(1), lp(1), lpr(1), dxhanyuim(1X), dxhanziim(1X), xset(1X), lpd(8), lprsetup(8)

Files: printcap(4)

Others: big5(5), code_page(5), dechanyu(5), dechanzi(5), eucTW(5), i18n_intro(5), i18n_printing(5), iconv_intro(5), keyboard(5), l10n_intro(5), sbig5(5), telecode(5), Unicode(5)

Writing Software for the International Market


 

Index

NAME
DESCRIPTION
Codesets
Locales
Keyboards, Input Servers, and Input Methods
Chinese Terminals
Running X and Motif Applications
Printers
SEE ALSO

This document was created by man2html, using the manual pages.
Time: 02:43:08 GMT, October 02, 2010